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Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Photos from around the nation

21 August 2017 5:27 PM
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Total Solar Eclipse 2017: Photos from around the nation

Scenes from throughout the United States and around the world as people prepare to see a rare total solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017.

A woman adjusts a telescope before the total solar eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

People adjust telescopes before the total solar eclipse on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

In this NASA handout, the International Space Station (bottom right), with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, August 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United State.

Solar eclipse fans dressed in festive attire on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible.

Solar eclipse watchers on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible.

Solar eclipse watchers build a "sand eclipse" on the beach, hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible.

Brian Marriott of Boston, Massachusetts looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

A woman trades eclipse glasses for email addresses August 20, 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina. The state capital city is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse and NASA expects clear weather could bring over a million visitors to the state.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

People set up cameras and telescopes as they prepare to watch the total eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

A van displays a written message about the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Morgan Squires, a park employee waits to help park and manage cars as they arrive to view the solar eclipse in Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017.

Image copyright 2017 Getty Images. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Attendance was light during a concert and carnival on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Campers, in town to view the solar eclipse, relax at their indoor campsites on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Four hundred campers paid $40-per-night to camp in the gymnasium. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Source: thedenverchannel.com

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